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kinput2

Kinput2 pops open a cool X window to show you possible kanji when you input romanji. I've got kinput2 to work with most programs that run under a kterm including jvim, mule, and xjdic.

\includegraphics{editors/images/kinput2.ps}

kinput2 and mule

I'm still trying to get kinput2 to work with mule under X Windows. Thanks to Paul Gampe, I've got it working under kterm. This is the .emacs sections.
;;; begin hacks to use kinput2 with mule
(setq kanji-flag t)
(setq kanji-process-code 1)

(cond ((boundp 'NEMACS) (setq kanji-display-code 3))
	  ((boundp 'MULE) (set-display-coding-system *euc-japan*)))

(cond ((boundp 'NEMACS) (setq kanji-fileio-code 3))
		 ((boundp 'MULE) (set-default-file-coding-system *euc-japan*)))

(cond ((boundp 'NEMACS) (setq kanji-input-code 3))
		((boundp 'MULE) (set-keyboard-coding-system *euc-japan*)))

UCSD has a concise guide to kinput2 at

http://www-cse.ucsd.edu/cse/CSE_Uptime/v4.10/kanji.sidebar.html

From denismcm@gol.com Fri Oct 18 17:14:05 1996
Date: Thu, 17 Oct 1996 21:40:25 +0900 (GMT+0900)
To: tlug@misc.twics.com
Subject: Re: kinput2 HOWTO

On Wed, 16 Oct 1996, C. Oda wrote:

> How do I get it to start accepting romanji for conversion to Kanji?
> In uum I press ctrl-\ and this small window opens up at the bottom
> of the screen.  I think press ctrl-w to do the henkan.

  There should be documentation on the CDrom you got kinput2 from (if
that's where you got it).  I hadn't looked for the online documents,
but there is quite a bit in Japanese and in  English in  ki2doc.tgz,
which is 69.315K.  I'll paste in the English doc on basic key bindings
for you below.

Dennis McMurchy, 
Tojinmachi, Fukuoka

__________________________________________________

** Kinput2 default key bindings **

[ This document describes the default key bindings of kinput2 when Wnn is ]
[ used as the conversion server.  If you're going to use Canna conversion ]
[ server, please see the documents of Canna instead.                      ]


* Conversion Start/End

The key used to start conversion depends on conversion protocol and
client.  In case of xlc protocol and XIMP protocol, shift-space should
work.  Otherwise, kinput2 cannot specify it so there's no default key
to start conversion. See the manual for each client.

control-Kanji
shift-space
	These keys end conversion.  If there is text that is not fixed, it
	is sent to the client.  It then pops down the conversion window,
	and kinputw will be waiting for the next conversion request.


* Text Input

The initial input mode is Roma-ji mode i.e. text typed in is changed
to Hiragana.

Tab	changes the input mode as follows:
		Romaji -> ASCII -> double-width ASCII -> Romaji
	If it is pressed with shift key, it changes the mode in reverse
	order.
	Note that ^I doesn't work.

^H	deletes the character before the text cursor.  If the current
	clause is converted, this puts it back into unconverted state
	before deletion.

Delete	deletes the character at the text cursor.  If the current clause
	is converted, this puts it back into unconverted state before
	deletion.

^U	erases all text.


* Conversion

^J or Kanji
	These keys do multiple clause conversion from the current clause
	onwards.
	If the current clause is already converted, a window is popped up,
	all the candidates for the current clause will be shown in the
	window, and then go into the candidate selection mode.

^G	puts the current clause back into unconverted state.

^N or Down arrow
	These keys substitute the current clause for the next candidate of
	the clause.  In candidate selection mode and symbol input mode,
	this key moves the cursor down by one.


^P or Up arrow
	These keys substitute the current clause for the previous
	candidate of the clause.  In candidate selection mode and symbol
	input mode, this key moves the cursor up by one.

^L	fixes the converted text, then sends it to the client.

^M	fixes the converted text, then sends it to the client followed by
	a newline.
	In candidate selection mode or symbol selection mode, it selects a
	candidate or symbol, then goes back to normal mode.


* Moving Cursor/Changing Current Clause

^F or Right arrow
	These keys move the text cursor forward.  If the text is already
	converted, the cursor moves forward a clause, otherwise a
	character.
	In the candidate selection mode or symbol input mode, these keys
	move the cursor to the next candidate.

^B or Left arrow
	These keys move the text cursor backward.  If the text is already
	converted, the cursor moves backward a clause, otherwise a
	character.
	In the candidate selection mode or symbol input mode, these keys
	move the cursor to the previous candidate.

^A	moves the text cursor to the beginning of the text.  It moves the
	cursor to the left most candidate in candidate selection mode or
	symbol input mode.

^E	moves the text cursor to the end of the text.  It moves the cursor
	to the right most candidate in candidate selection mode or symbol
	input mode.


* Expanding/Shrinking Clauses

shift-Right arrow
	expands the current clause by one character, then re-converts it.

shift-Left arrow
	shrinks the current clause by one character, then re-converts it.


* Katakana <-> Hiragana Conversion

F1 or mod1-1
	These keys convert the current clause into Katakana.

F2 or mod1-2
	These keys convert the current large clause into Hiragana.


* Miscellany

shift-Escape
	changes the current mode to symbol input mode.  Symbols defined in
	JIS X0208 (Kanji character set) are displayed in the pop up
	window.  You can move the cursor and select a symbol with carriage
	return.

F5 or mod1-5
	changes the current mode to JIS code input mode.  The text typed
	in is interpreted as a hexadecimal number representing a code of a
	Kanji defined in JIS X0208, and converted the corresponding Kanji
	character.
	To exit from the mode, type this key again.

F6 or mod1-6
	changes the current mode to JIS Kuten code input mode.  The text
	typed in is interpreted as a decimal number representing a 'ku'
	number and a 'ten' number of a	Kanji, and converted the
	corresponding Kanji character.



Craig Toshio Oda
1998-05-07